Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

In the interest of providing useful information, which is rare with me I know, here are links to a few things I recommend. (Real reason: it’s a hodgepodge link-fest because I’m still comatose from the giant meal I made yesterday. And even though I’ve been trying to lose four pounds for, oh, the last six months, I made a feast that is basically the opposite of anything that might aid that process. What with all the sour cream and Gruyere and pasta. But there were vegetables! And fruit! Which were not deep-fried or served on Texas toast!)

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)  Now for the recommendations.

Double D RV Resort: Despite the name, Double D doesn’t discriminate – this Single B is living proof. The campsite was clean and quiet. (Texola, Oklahoma, just across the border from Shamrock, Texas; $22/night, or $11/night with Passport America.)

Loop 289 RV Park: Not scenic, but clean, and no implied breast-size requirement. My only complaint is it took me two tries and one phone call to find it. (Lubbock, Texas; $22/night.)

Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum: When they say historical they’re not kidding – we’re talking all the way back to the Cambrian Period. Go big or go home! (2503 4th Ave., Canyon, Texas; $10, or $9 with AAA.)

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

There Will Be Blood

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

My moccasin obsession continues.

 

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

Controlled Volatility

Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument: Because people were stealing flint and vandalizing, you now have to tour the site with a ranger. I hate people. But I don’t hate our guide, who looked just like Santa. He said nomads traveled through there going back 12,000 years, but the Antelope Creek Indians settled between 1150 and 1500 and used the flint for tools, weapons, and trade. Archeologists found ruins of villages and quarries, some as big as 35’ across and 6’ deep. The Antelope Creek Indians vanished, theories being drought (no buffalo to hunt), Apaches (aggressive), and Spaniards (ditto). The Apaches left because the Comanches took over, who were even less pleasant. Side note: I told the ranger I was going to Lake Meredith after the tour and he chirped, Make sure to wear something orange! It’s hunting season! (Near Fritch, Texas; free, but call for reservations.)

Lake Meredith National Recreation Area: The lake was created when they dammed (not damned, as I first typed) the Canadian River with the Sanford Dam. Not a lot of hiking there, but if you’re into boating or fishing there’s plenty to do. (Near Fritch, Texas; free.)

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

Pretty

Tower Gas Station and U Drop Inn (Corner of Hwy 83 and Old Route 66, Shamrock, Texas.)

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

Art Deco and Fuel: A Winning Combo

Pioneer West Museum: I loved this, because it had artifacts and terror. (204 N. Madden, Shamrock, Texas; free.)

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

Artifact: Saddle

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

Terror: Why is there a bag over this man’s face? And where are his hands and legs?

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

Somebody get that thing off her!

Where to Stay and What to Do in the Texas Panhandle (and Oklahoma)

Waiting for a shave, or dead?

Enjoy the weekend, everyone. On Monday: I confess.

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